Increasing the speed of tremolo picking - please send help

So, it seems like the only thing to do now is to put some hours/days/weeks of work into this, right?
Is there any strategy on how to approach the practice the best?
Training proper movements at slower tempo?
Just forcing myself to try and play the thing at 100% hoping it will finally click?

To give some insight - whenever I had to play anything with fast tremolo I would put my hand in pronated position, get all tense and just bash the strings as fast as I can. But this way does not give nearly enough control to switch strings or stay true to the metronome.

Now I try to use suppination, and that is a partial success - I have much more control and can relax a bit, but I am still yet to discover the proper picking mechanics, like how to make each stroke even and pronounced. I tried to have the pick at an angle, using the edge, and while it makes it easier to pick strings fast, it also sounds mushy.

And also I realised that it is not the speed that I need to improve - my hand is perfectly capable of reaching the desired tempo, I need more control over it - to make it even, in time, and to be able to switch strings freely. Also, I need this to be more reliable - one day I am struggling to pick at 120 at all, and one day 180 seems suspiciously easy!

EDIT: one more thing. It seems slighly more douable with small, thick and pointy pick, BUT it constantly slips out of my fingers, I rub my index against higher strings and it is difficult to switch to lower strings.
Maybe I am overanalysing it, who knows, but that’s what I noticed.

I’m not claiming to have the final word here, but all I can say is what worked for me, and I play this style every day, sometimes for many hours. And what worked best for my repertoire was practicing to the song, accuracy be damned. No metronome practice, no “notching up”, just going for it. And in the end, I was able to play cleanly. I haven’t yet found a song where this method of practice has failed me.

In that black metal thread I linked, most people who played in this style agreed they did that sort of practice too. Now, I can’t TELL you what to do, I can only suggest. There’s no word of god here.

Just keep the following in mind:

  1. The bulk of neuroscience research, the research/conversations/interviews Troy has done, and the experiences of great players in the practice room suggests that “going for it” and trying to replicate a fast motion by immediately attempting things at tempo is valid. Interesting experiment here, check it out: https://bulletproofmusician.com/struggling-to-get-a-tricky-passage-up-to-tempo-try-this-clever-practice-technique/

  2. Around here, it’s agreed that if what you’re doing isn’t producing a desired result, you need to switch things up. Affectionately referred to as “shuffling the deck”. In a micro sense, this could be changing your pick out for another one, changing your grip, etc. In a larger sense, changing your approach to practice.

I strongly encourage you to ditch the metronome practice and only practice the parts you are struggling with to the song for an entire week. Make it a challenge to yourself. Refuse to slow down no matter how frustrated you might get. Put the metronome away and you could wind up surprised.

That’s more or less what I am doing now.
However I had the metronome turned on in DAW when practicing the song with backing track, should I just turn it off completely?

Okay, great. Yeah, I’d recommend following the drummer exclusively. Try to match the song exclusive of any clicks. In other words, follow only what you’d hear if you were listening to the song in your spare time. Post back with your results it’d be awesome to see.

First, I think @guitarenthusiast is giving good advice here.

Second, regarding pick: I suggest trying a full-size, thick and pointy pick. Jazz III XL is my favorite (I use the black “stiffo” nylon ones). They don’t present the grip problems some people experience with the “standard” Jazz IIIs. Dunlop Ultex Sharp (variety of thicknesses) is also very good for keeping a bright attack while picking very fast.

Here’s my try with just raw guitars, no backing track unfortunately - Soundcloud will not allow me to upload with backing track due to copyrights.

https://soundcloud.com/damian-piekut/888raw/s-7CUx8

I think it is triplets, not straight 16th.

That’s the one I am using the most actually.

EDIT:
This is the best I can do:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Qa6nNaNrBY&feature=youtu.be

Note the video was taken separately.
Does this sound OK for you guys? I can’t count all the notes played, but DAW says some might be missing…

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Sounds pretty good to me. And I could be imagining things, but to me you seem more relaxed here than in the video at the start of the thread. Looks like maybe you’re using a wrist posture that’s a little more flexed?

Correct.
And that was at 3AM, after sooo many hours trying to do it, and after accidentally deleting an almost perfect version…

There still is another riff in that song that is somewhat more difficult, more dynamic, but I guess it is just a matter of time before I master it.

I’m assuming you’re referring to a string skipping part? Those in the context of tremolo picking can be very brutal at high speeds.

Well, yes, next riff has more string skipping that the one above.
But I tried yesterday and I managed 150 BPM with the next riff, 160 was just a tad too fast.

What I want to play is tricky, because I need to increase both the speed and accuracy.