FordScales - What the heck is "FordScales?"


#21

So the FordScales concept has its patterns, but it also comprises insights about, and research into, solfege, which I try to leverage as much as possible…


#22

tagged on origin of the phrase - was something arbitrarily constructed/composed by me for the sake of the other discussion


#23

For the adventurous, here are some blues scales, min and major versions…

    (b5)  5   .   .  b7   .
  R   .   .  b3   .   4


      Eb  E   .   .   G   .
  A   .   .   C   .   D


      .   5   .   6   .   .
  R   .   2 (b3)  3   .


      .   E   .   F#  .   .
  A   .   B   C   C#  .

All other blues scale patterns may be derived by rotating the notes through the cell.

    (b5)  5   .   .  b7   .
  R   .   .  b3   .   4

      4 (b5)  5   .   .  b7  
  .   R   .   .  b3   . 

      .   4 (b5)  5   .   .    
 b7   .   R   .   .  b3    

etc.


Fretboard Visualization Methods
#24

@GCAN, there’s the origin. @JakeEstner’s mighty talented and a nice guy too. :slight_smile:


#25

Borrowing a subject from the “Fretboard Visualization” thread, and @patternblue

So yeah, within the chromatic system, given a root note and the structure of the “In Sen,” I immediately have 12 patterns in mind for the same, because musically, it’s all one pattern. And, those twelve patterns each fit on two strings.

For example, here is the pattern @patternblue expressed on the Fretboard Visualization thread, expressed in the key of C, within the FordScales chromatic…

1 b2 4 5 b7  (Insen)

Expressed on root C…

    .  .  F   .  G  .    
.  Bb  .  C  Db  . 

And similar to as illustrated by @patternblue on the other thread…

F Insen…

  b7  .  1 b2  .  .
.  4  .  5  .  .

Gb Insen…

   . b7  .  1 b2  .
.  .  4  .  5  .

G Insen…

   .  . b7  .  1 b2
.  .  .  4  .  5

There is obviously a lot more repetition of similarity with the pentatonics as one rotates them around the chromatic cell. Here is one more, wrapped to Ab…

Ab Insen Scale

    5  .  . b7  .  1
b2  .  .  .  4  .  

Don’t know if any of that is interesting, but it took me many a mile in its general application.


#26

Fwiw, despite “unsupported file type” message, the link for the Confirmation FordScales arrangement seems to work, but one’ll need to “open in…” gp7.x.

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B4365jimLkwTNG5nVDB6bjV6ZjVsZUhTNXpacVc3U2MyS1JZ

Let me know if there is some other problem?

Not quite ready to pay SoundSlice to host premium content constructed in a different app. :slight_smile: They let you post publicly for the world for free, but not with any control of origin domains and visibility. Five dollars a month for that!


#27

So enough whining about tools for now, here is how the key of C major/A minor lays on the fretboard starting on the fifth fret, sixth string, FordScales Chromatic position…

                  .  E  F  .  G  . 
               A  .  B  C  .  D
         .  E  F  .  G  . 
      A  .  B  C  .  D
   .  E  F  .  G  . 
A  .  B  C  .  D

And for comparison and contrast, here is C (ascending) melodic minor/B altered…

                  Eb .  F  .  G  . 
               A  .  B  C  .  D
         Eb .  F  .  G  . 
      A  .  B  C  .  D
   Eb .  F  .  G  . 
A  .  B  C  .  D

And C harmonic minor…

                  Eb .  F  .  G  Ab
               .  .  B  C  .  D
         Eb .  F  .  G  Ab
      .  .  B  C  .  D
   Eb .  F  .  G  Ab
.  .  B  C  .  D

Happy Labor Day weekend to folks here in the states. Pleasant Sunday to all!


#28

Hey there @AGTG, I think I answered your latter question, but not the first.

The FordScales Open/Closed patterns are moveable, and intersect with the FordScales Chromatic pattern, and themselves.

The open and closed refer to the general spread of the hand while playing, the closed pattern occupying four frets (at least referencing diatonic major), and the open pattern occupies five (again referencing major).

The Berklee positions I originally learned are based around stretching from the pinky or from the index finger to reach notes outside of the boxes. The ring and middle are thought to stay together in their diagrams… That led to exploration of wider voicings more akin to what I perceived my primary music hero, Allan Holdsworth, doing in performance. The moveable FordScales Open/Closed patterns have some of the advantages of three note per string playing, and one may find utility in being able to identify a handy pattern anywhere they happen to be on the neck.

The FordScales Open/Closed Patterns don’t imply any particular fingering per se, just general open and closed hand moments. Sliding, bending, stretching… All of the guitarisms we enjoy are viable within the frameworks.

Here is an example of the open pattern joining with itself. One may see why I moved on to other visualizations after playing with them for awhile. I think @patternblue did too albeit perhaps more akin to Goodrick’s “Moveable Mini Positions” from The Advancing Guitarist?

      4     5     6
      1     2     3
4     5     6     7
1     2     3
5     6     7

And lets say one needed to play a whole-step up with a chord change, one may find a pattern within reach quickly, the O’s represent the pattern immediately above, with the pattern for the change overlaying it with X’s. The O’s in parenthesis represent tones not present after the change.

    X (O) X  X     O
    X (O) X  X     O
(O) X  X     X     O
(O) X  X     X    
 O     O     O

Folks have found it all very powerful, but please be careful and prefer slides and position shifts to stretches if one is not used to playing in the wider stretch realm. If one is playing scales up and down, there may be more hand friendly, perhaps easier, ways. On the other hand, if one is improvising melodies on the fly the patterns become more—please excuse the pun—handy.


#29

Since I brought it up in @tommo’s thread on ascending…

                  .  E  .  F# .  G# 
               A  .  B  .  C# D 
         .  E  .  F# .  G# 
      A  .  B  .  C# D
   .  E  .  F# .  G# 
A  .  B  .  C# D

…FordScales Chromatic Approach, A Major. Starting in 5th position, ending on the first string 16th fret.


#30

…which of course, is enharmonically equivalent to, D Lydian, and the five other remaining related modes of the A Major scale.

Patternwise, take the major scale by the same name and raise the fourth to derive the Lydian mode in parallel. In terms of the 12 notes of the FordScales Chromatic Approach, the musical structure for Lydian may start on any tone, and wraps around as necessary, but is always the same.

The physical shapes the scale makes on the fretboard within each key and the virtual bounds of the 6nps chromatic scale are relatively memorable, and consistent through the octaves.

Happy Friday all!


#31

For @BullseyeBrewtality, with regard to Zakk Wylde playing in two keys A Minor and F Minor:

I’ve posted the FordScales Chromatic A Minor pattern before. Here goes again. Bear in mind that the A I’m starting on is at the fifth fret on the low E string. Also I’ve graphically illustrated the shift between the G and B strings.

A Natural Minor 

                  .  E  F  .  G  . 
               A  .  B  C  .  D
         .  E  F  .  G  . 
      A  .  B  C  .  D
   .  E  F  .  G  . 
A  .  B  C  .  D


F Natural Minor

                  Eb .  F  .  G  Ab 
               .  Bb .  C  Db .
         Eb .  F  .  G  Ab 
      .  Bb .  C  Db .
   Eb .  F  .  G  Ab 
.  Bb .  C  Db .

The other “positions” may be found by starting the chromatic scale reference point from a different starting “A” note.

Two keys, two patterns, but really, it’s just one melodic pattern laying differently within an arbitrarily located chromatic scale (starting on A alternating with Eb, six chromatic notes per string).

Have a great weekend everyone!!!

Peace out,
Daniel