Picking paradiddles warm-up, check it out!

I came up with this while working on the Meshuggah Bleed pattern and have been using it every time to warm up; I dig it a ton, and hope y’all do too!

Paradiddles used:

D D U

D U U

D D U U

D U D D U D U U

D D U D U U D U

D U U D U D D U

Let me know what y’all think: helpful, confusing, not worthwhile?

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Hey that’s cool! I’ve been interested in making exercises with drum rudiments but never got around to it. I’ll check this out tomorrow morning.

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@Lewis The only thing I’ve seen that’s somewhat similar to drumming rudiments is alternate picking with various accent points, but I feel like this helps me with pick control way more.

I saw your post on this and tried it, it’s really cool and might help me to improve accuracy and control so I’ve been doing a similar workout the past few days and will continue :+1:

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That’s a cool idea! I’d never thought of that.

Even though I’ve started learning drums on a vkit early last year, the idea of using drum rudiments on guitar never occurred to me!

Will have to give this a go.

Keep us updated on your progress with this!

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I haven’t tried keeping any kind of benchmark so far, but I’ve been starting at the same BPM every time (85) and the patterns have been clean and more second nature with every session. I’ve been stopping at 95 I think, and my picking feels pretty warmed up when I start playing. Not only that, but I feel like it forces me to hold the pick in the best way possible (and location on the string) every time, I’m guessing because the double upstrokes have to sound comparable to double downstrokes.

I wonder if this has impacted my top speeds at all. The first time I did this, I was feeling some interesting things in my wrist / forearm (a similar “effort” feeling to playing a hard rhythm or lead line you’re not used to), but now it feels pretty effortless.