Who would you like to see interviewed next by Troy and the team?


#206

He definitely doesn’t.

This video shows a lot of good shots of his right hand as he plays. Not a pick in sight.


#207

I think a Kevin Eubanks interview would be very interesting as well - for theory, improvization, technique, and musicianship. And also for having some of the most outrageous/awesome album covers ever:

image


#208

Also, just his perspective on being in the music business! He was a guitarist a lot of people saw and heard pretty much every night for years, even if they didn’t necessarily know his name. That’s pretty damn awesome.


#209

There are several people I’d like to hear interviews that come to mind.

Today it would be the amazing Scott Jones out of St. Louis, Missouri.
Also I’d want to hear Joe Chawki out of Colorado by way of New York.

Both can play at very high velocities and adding interest Joe is a lefty.


#210

Paul Gilbert

George Bellas https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FkjEaEZ2Hk

This guy is an insane picker.


#211

Andy James
Jason Richardson
Nick Johnston
Y. Malmsteen
Joe Satriani
Tommy Emmanuel
Christophe Godin
Guthrie Govan
Michael Romeo
Al Di Meola
Rick Graham
Biréli Lagrène
Paul Gilbert and Bruce Bouillet
James Hetfield (Would love to see his downpicking technique in slow mo)
Troy Grady (I guess it’s a good guy)
Angel Vivaldi
Tosin Abasi
Steve Terreberry

PS : I’m french, so if you need someone to talk with French Guitarist, I can help you Troy ! :slight_smile:


#212

Joe Chawki is a pretty unique player, (lefty who strings regular) and judging from his first album, an absolute shred monster.


#213

Yes! Christophe is great!


#214

Also, I was thinking maybe some more players who have monster technique outside of the typical shred/rock/metal world. Pat Metheny and Bill Frisell would be amazing and Metheny especially has a fairly unconventional picking hand mechanic.


#215

Whoever they interview, here’s a question they should ask: “Have you ever blacked-out on alcohol?”


#216

Fernando Caneca

I would like to know the secret of the invisibility
about what’s going on in the artist’s head while composing and improvising.
The technique is just a side effect.


#217

Another vote for Tommy Emmanuel.


#218

Jarle H Olsen! The guy alternate and economy picks like Paul Gilbert and Yngwie in their prime times 2. His sweeping is also Impeccable. I believe he at one point studied with George Bellas. He’s a scary scary player, even got praised by shred monster Jeff loomis. I’m not exaggerating when I say that this guy might make John Petrucci and Michael Angelo Batio poop their pants. It’s as if the guy has super saiyan powers on the guitar. Like… If guitar playing were a game he’d be the secret overlord that would be harder to beat than the actual end boss. The only guys I know of that might remotely come close to this dude are Paul Wardingham, Rick Graham and Marshall Harrison. That’s gotta say something.


#219

What band is he in? What kind of music does Olsen play?


#220

Prog Guitarist, Also has a last ninja coverband playing old game tunes. Has 1 solo album under his name and it’s amazing “Quadrasonic” he also makes guitar lesson material for guitar messenger.


#221

There’s a great list of names here already, hard to name anyone that hasn’t been mentioned.

For me personally, John Petrucci is number one. I just think the world needs to see his right hand under a microscope or in slow mo. Or to hear him discuss these concepts because he’s a very technically minded player and the conversation would be fascinating.

James Hetfied… same thing just on the downpicking side. He would scoff and say that he doesn’t know what he is doing and that he’s not even a lead player… but he’s already done a Discovery Channel episode of Time Warp… so just tell him that you’re from the Discovery Channel and that you want to understand his right hand picking a bit better. He really is one of the masters in my opinion, regardless of tempo or other players being more technically minded. He’s also not the type to do much instructional or technical minded stuff, so it’d be great to hear his thoughts on how he approaches the whole thing. It’d be a shame if he never shared that with anyone, and Cracking the Code is as good as any, in terms being able to do that.

Eric Johnson… the seminars break down his style really well, but it’d be great to see him discuss these ideas in real time. And also… it’d be great to dive a little into his chording and rhythm playing. There’s a lot in what he does, and his fast “Cascades of Dover” is only one part of it. Pretty much everything Eric does is really high class and elite.

Anyone ever mentioned on any of the videos, any big name… anyone would be great. Martin Miller was a great guy to have on, but there’s plenty more where he came from. But for me personally, those 3 above… any of them would be great. Here’s hoping… fingers crossed.

In conclusion… one final thought. If there’s a list or a hierarchy, please focus on the older guys first, those epic big names from the 70’s, 80’s or 90’s. Those “classic” guys. There’s plenty of time for those younger guys down the line, those younger guys aren’t going anywhere! Also, the older guys are like a fine wine and have a lot more wisdom… and usually a lot of the ego has faded away making the whole thing a lot more worthwhile/pleasurable to watch or learn from.


#222

John Goodsall. Fire Merchants and Brand X are the outfits he’s played with.


#223

I don’t think Hetfield is hiding any particular mechanical secret, raw persistence and endurance is probably the thing.

I’m inclined to say the same about JP but that might just be me.

Still, I’d like to see some magnet footage of Hetfield, Dino Cazares, Vogg, Jon Schaffer out of curiosity.


#224

Did anyone mention Steve Lukather? One of the “shreddiest” concerts I’ve ever attended was a Toto gig. So both lots of notes AND Africa!


#225

Which is funny because on facebook Luke discussed his playing has slowed down because the Toto tour bus had an accident (came to a quick stop) where he fell and hurt his hand and he feels his speed is not up to where it was when he was younger. Which is crazy because he can play pretty quickly.