Kiko Loureiro and Li-sa X at NAMM 2018

#1

This makes me want to quit:

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Kiko Loureiro picking
#3

I was watching some of Li-sa X’s videos and she’s been playing this tune since she was 9!! She probably does have her guitar set up with a low action and I’m guessing Kiko does too. This riff calls for some crosspicking too, maybe someone is doing some swiping somewhere along the line :hushed:

#5

Everyone has strengths and weakness so I try not to get intimidated by prodigies (to use a silly and often undeserved word). She’s very well rehearsed and has a good head start in the chops dept but in her video with Troy she seems to have difficulty doing anything that wasn’t already programmed into her trickbag. Now I feel like a shithead for picking on a little girl. I’m just saying there are holes there just like in anyone else’s playing.

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#7

hahah, cheers guys!

It’s just a bit disheartening when you think you’re doing ok, then you see a 12 year old girl playing stuff you can only dream of playing.

#8

No thats great … it means in the end teaching has improved, hopefully one day we’ll raise the perfect player.

Disheartening that i contributed zero for raising the next player generation and of course the small amount of chicks from being a rockstar :sweat_smile:

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#9

You better hit the woodshed @aliendough
You gonna let Lisa X bounce a whammy bar in your face like that ?

:bear:

#10

I think it’s good for a player to have faults sometimes. Too perfect a player will sound like midi, although if they have a mastery of all genres of songwriting too, then I would love to see that.

haha no way man!!

I think I’m too old too get really good, just gotta work with what I got.

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#11

I’m totally with you there.
With perfect i meant more that there’s no physical limit, not playing like a machine.
To me perfect music involves more than just the player and the instrument, especially for guitar where the relation to the tone is very physical, there’s so many things that do and should do impact the playing.

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#12

Everyone has strengths and weakness so I try not to get intimidated by prodigies (to use a silly and often undeserved word)

Worse even: you can see here at around 5:20 a very small passage that poor Kiko had to hybrid pick some passages Lisa-X was cross-picking fluidly. Good thing Kiko has a thicker skin than that; although he probably doesn’t know what the hell cross-picking is anyway… :grin:

Here’s the performance, or at least what was posted on Kiko’s channel, with fluid 60FPS for right-hand addicts but terrible picture quality unfortunately.

#13

Some nice RH footage here:

#14

Why should it be limited to NAMM 2018? Let’s go for NAMM 2019!

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#15

This video just answered my most important questions regarding practice. Mind you that these questions were unanswered for years and after lessons with 3 different teachers. My current one has a similar mindset and that’s probably why I made leaps of improvement after we started working together.

I always thought that 8h per day was the answer. I tried to follow that rule of thumb only to get frustrated and hate guitar playing, because I have some attention issues (nothing major) that won’t let me do an activity for more than 1h straight without losing focus.

This method of 1h practicing and 20min breaks has helped me through University, foreign language learning and on guitar as well. 3 sessions of that per day are more than enough for improvement in technical areas. One hour of paying attention to every detail regarding a certain technique is more valuable than 3h noodling around in my opinion.

Since I’m trying to get my degree this year I left guitar a bit behind but I think I can spend 1h every day and do what Kiko says. It makes sense to me and how my brain works. Hopefully in a few months this 1h can get up to 3h and put in there some theory learning and song writting practice.

#16

I saw that video earlier. Li-sa X is really incredible and the footage of her jamming with her younger brother is insane.

#17

If you were to read Noa Kageyama’s work on his blog or here, on Master in Mechanics, he alludes to that as well: quality over quantity… with sufficient quantity of course! Let’s say quality and frequency rather than quantity then.

Speaking about Kiko, he’s had a couple of videos about how he practices certain licks. In short, “dedicated practice” applies here.

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#18

I am a fan of Li-sa X and am willing to bet that she (a) has a good guitar teacher and (b) practices a lot. In some sense she is analogous to a lot of young musicians in classical music, I am betting that she is not self-taught. (Being self-taught is risky.)

#19

Hank! Where have you been? I haven’t seen you here in a long time and you used to post a lot! You contribute a lot to this forum; it’s always better when you are posting! Give us at least a post to let us know how you’re doing, OK?

This girl Lisa X seems to be a prodigy. I think I heard her play something before this but I can’t remember what it was - I’m pretty sure it was a cover song from the 80s or 90s though. Anybody can be a technician so the real test will be what kinds of songs can she write? I hope it turns out that she is just as creative as she is technically skilled. That would be truly impressive!

Why do you suppose she’s wearing headphones? Kiko isn’t.

It would be interesting to find out what kind f parents she has. When I see someone this young and alreasy this technically accomplished it…what is the expression I’m looking for? I guess you could say it “raises a red flag.” Is she doing this because she truly loves it or are her parents making her practice more than she would like? I don’t limit this to musicians; the same questions come to mind when I see an unusually accomplished child athlete. Are the parents pushing their child to live out their dreams for them, or are they simply being supportive of their child’s own dreams? I hope this doesn;t come across as negative. I love to see children excelling at something but…only if it’s because that is truly what the child wants to be doing.

We all only get one childhood. Childhood is a precious time of our lives. So when I see parents forcing their child to put in a tremendous amount of time and effort primarily so they can vicariously live out their own dreams with no regard for what the child would like to be spending his or her childhood doing, it’s quite troubling. Again, I don’t know anything about Lisa X’s parents. For all I know they may be wonderful parents who are just being supportive of their daughter’s goals - at least I hope that’s the case!

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#20

She has very good teachers (world class, like Paul Gilbert), loves what she does and her dad is a musician. She also doesn’t practice that much. Your passive aggressive implications are just silly.

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#21

Did I say something to you? I don’t think I did. Have you even introduced yourself to me, or was that just it? Pure class. Keep it up.